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Become a Self Taught Photographer

The photographer is an artist. This is a creative person. There are thousand various ways of becoming great from various famous photographers like Helmut Newton or George Edward Hurrell. Here’re some tips which, however, will perfectly fit an ordinary modern person willing to become a good photographer.

1. Drink a bottle of champagne in the morning, after the breakfast – for courage, and to mark the beginning of a new life.

2. Take a TV cable and cut it off. You can throw your TV set through the window, as well. Now you’re ready.

3. Realize and accept your new hobby (or passion) as its is.

4. For the first time, completely exclude reading some non-photographic literature. Read it everywhere: in the kitchen, in the bathroom, bedroom, and other locations. Read literature about the photos and photo albums, successful photographers, online editing/proofing software, mobile photo processing tools, etc. After some time, you will have a grasp of photography theory as a result of reading. Any information hunger for books and periodicals will be good for you and make the learning process easy and fun.

5. Train your eye, dwell on imagination. Whatever you do, look for photographic subjects and angles. Do not be distracted by nonsense. Focus, watch at home, on the road, at work, at rest, having sex, walking the dog, always, in general. If your attention is scattered, and you forget about the photos, use reminders.

6. As soon as you see something worthy of capturing (object, still life, landscape, person, genre scene, interesting texture, and so forth.), take a camera and picture it.

7. After making shots always ask yourself: “Why?”. Your art should have reason and purpose, and the history. Close your eyes, open your mind and try to absorb the sacramental photography knowledge spilled everywhere in the environment. Urge for inspiration in ordinary things that surround you every day, even in routine.