This is default featured slide 1 title
This is default featured slide 2 title
This is default featured slide 3 title
This is default featured slide 4 title
 

Monthly Archives: August 2017

Photo Retouching

Photo retouching is techniques and processes of getting an image ready for final presentation are implemented by image retouching, resulting in augmentation of its looks. Almost all images you see in any format of advertisements have undergone retouching, which can vary from just a subtle change to a dramatic changeover of various elements of the image. Even the photos of real beauty campaigns undergo this important process, may be for small improvements like dust removal and sharpening.

Image retouching works towards slightly changing, rather improving, looks of the subject. The digital manipulation includes basic “fixes”, like erasing pimples or making a ruddy complexion appear even. Experienced and talented photo retouches can even perform more complex manipulations such as making a subject appear slimmer or even morphing two or more subjects seamlessly. Scars on the face or body of a person are also easily erased through this process of digital enhancement.

In the case of a product, the experts of photo retouching make the product appear attractive by all round development of its image. Mostly a reader or viewer decides on buying a product after seeing its picture, especially decor items or furniture, quality enhancement of their images holds the key to attract customers. Hence this process ensures that the products look attractive by highlighting its important areas in every possible manner.

At the onset, the professionals at retouching analyze the image from the point of view of a viewer and assert what improvements are needed to make the picture look more attractive, impressive and lively. They use advanced computer imaging software to change the appearance of a photo or any other digital image.

The two most common ways of retouching a photo are sharpening the image or causing some parts to become blurry, ostensibly to hide some deformity. Other important ways to enhancing the looks of a person are hiding blemishes, like pimples and scars, as well as retouching the skin to give it a smoother or more youthful appearance.

Tips Pose Like Model for Photos

1. The Classic Hands-On-Hip

It’s always a good idea to not leave your hands limp or rogue. Perching one arm on the hip, weight shifted to one side and relaxing your shoulders. This “Teapot” pose is so popular with models, it slims your figure and creates a tall and dignified look that makes the waist appears slimmer. Be sure to position your lifted arm that’s placed on the hip to show off any fancy accessories or nail polish art.

2. Use the Mirror

Pose in front of your new BFF, the mirror, until you are near perfect at it. Learn your body shape and pick sides and angles you love. Forget about feeling guilty about your vanity, and remember “all is vanity”. Use your imagination and pretend someone else is behind the mirror, camera in hand and snapping away. Keep your feet in check for full-body shots, they are always closest to the mirror and you do not want to appear big-footed.

3. Go Lower

When sitting your camera height should be well above your eye level and your photographer standing a little far for the best result. This particular technique would show all your features, hair and makeup and also give you the illusion of a more petite, skinny frame.

Photographers often totally forget their own height and shoot from below the model’s eye line and you should never let them do that if you want the perfect photo. The chances that a shot from below help increase the height of subject or create the dramatic heroine shot you may be looking for are slim, and failed results with disappearing chins, weird shadows and dwarf shots are nearly always the end game.

For selfies, keeping your phone lens above your head will capture only your best angles and keep your neck looking elongated and swan-like.

4. Turn Your Head

If your face is asymmetrical in any way, not to worry you’re in good company. The easy fix for photos is to turn your head a bit when snapping and let the perfect tilt and camera angle hide that crooked smile of yours. Tilting your head is also a great trick for slimming your profile so if you really want to pose like a model, try turning slightly rather than facing the camera head on.

5. Stand Straight, Chin Out

Let the one thing you do not forget about perfecting your photo posture be to put your best foot and chin forward and stand up straight.

Cameras are only two-dimensional, meaning a photo cannot display its subject in all three dimensions unless it is shot that way purposely. When posing in front of the camera and looking straight at it, pushing your chin out, down and forward can extend your jawline, creating the sharper and stronger facial lines that are associated with model features.

6. Bounce Your Shoulders

Positioning your shoulders is often thought of as a small detail but shoulders play a major in determining how the face is highlighted or not in a photo. Rolling your shoulders back can allow your face pop up and instantly slim your upper body’s appearance.

Popping one shoulder up higher than the other can also create much needed dimension in an image.

7. Bend Your Knees

Bending one leg slightly at the knee and putting one’s weight on the straight leg would help define your waist and emphasize curves if you have them, or create them when you don’t. Cross your knees slightly for the great camera effect this pose gives!

Home Photography Studio Kit

1. Professional Photography Background Kit… I toyed for some time as to which background kit to get. Prices varied from under £30 (US$43 approx.) to £200 (US$288 approx.). In the end, I opted for best quality – something that will be reliable and not start falling to pieces after a few uses. I felt that this is one of those purchases you only want to make ONCE. I ended up buying a kit from Creativity Papers (based in the UK), who also sell on Amazon (UK). The kit came with two tripod uprights; a multi-piece crossbar (allowing you to have different widths, depending on the size of your room – I only use two of the four bars, so it fits nicely in my 3 meter wide room); and one roll of arctic white paper. I also purchased a roll of ultra black paper and a cherry red color (this last one I’ve NEVER ONCE USED; I thought I was going to be all creative with using different backgrounds, but when it comes to taking the photos, I find I just want to get it done with the minimum of fuss, either using a white background for darker colored objects, or a black background for lighter colored stuff).

2. “A Clamps”… The backdrop kit that I purchased actually came with a couple of metal A Clamps, which are used to secure the backdrop paper to tables, as the rolls of backdrop paper have a natural tendency to try and roll themselves back up. If your backdrop kit doesn’t come with them, you may need about four of them (at minimum). If I’m just hanging the backdrop straight down and not flowing it over a table, I will use a couple of metal A Clamps to weight-down the paper, so it can’t unravel. However, the weight of the metal A Clamps has a tendency to continue unrolling more paper; so, to fix this, I clamp two additional A Clamps into the roll of backdrop paper, where it hangs on the crossbar. I actually purchased a pack of about 8-10 of these A Clamps, “just in case” I need to use more. But, for the most part, I tend to only need a maximum of four clamps.

3. External Flash / Speed Light… When using a DSLR camera for product photography (especially if you have access to a tripod), there is a temptation to try and get away without using an external flash, by just using a longer exposure time – just enough until the image isn’t either too dark, nor too bright, but somewhere in between. However, the problem you’ll soon find is that some detail, in most non-flat objects, will be lost in the shadows. If you’re taking photos of products for eBay or Amazon, for instance, you want to show off as much detail as possible, for your prospective buyers. Using flash DOES make a positive difference. There may be a temptation to try using the pop-up flash (if your camera has one), but things do look better if you can take the flash away from the central position and over to about a 45 degrees angle to your subject. Being able to move the flash about your subject helps to maximize the results.

4. One OR Two Tripods… If you’re going to be using an external flash to illuminate your subject(s), you may need two tripods – one for the flash unit and the other for your camera (some of the time I find myself happy to take photos just handholding the camera; other times, I like to give my shoulders, arms and back a rest, and set the camera on its tripod). You don’t necessarily need a lightweight carbon fiber tripod for indoor photography work, as you’re not hiking about with the thing. Carbon fiber tripods cost more than the comparably heavier aluminium tripods. I have an aluminium tripod (MeFoto Roadtrip) for my external flash and, because I do take my camera outdoors, I have a carbon fiber 3LT “Brian”, which is very versatile.

5. Portable Photography Reflector Kit & Tripod Stand… While having multiple external flash units is probably ideal, it IS an expensive route to go (if you can afford it, or believe you’ll be able to justify the cost, then it’s a great option). However, a more economical option would be to set up your single external flash unit (pointing at your subject from the front, albeit off at a 45 degree angle) and then, directly opposite the flash, have a reflector angled so that it will throw otherwise lost flash light, directly back into your subject, illuminating some of the detail on the side that the flash light can’t directly reach. For this task, I purchased a portable photography reflector kit that came with its own tripod stand (so I didn’t need someone else to hold the reflector – meaning I could get on with my photography projects, without having to nag a relative to do the job… I certainly didn’t have the funds or inclination to pay someone to do the job. This kit solved the matter).

Some Wonderful Effects of Photography

Panning

Panning is a photography technique that is mostly used to shoot moving objects such as sports cars, race competitions. It involves the horizontal, rotational and vertical movement of an image or video. To achieve best results of a sharp subject with a blurred background, you need to stay with an object as you frame and press the shutter button. It is among the old techniques, so it needs a lot of practice and patience to master.

Thirds rule

It is a method that is frequently used by artists and painters. Work produced using the technique can be found in art galleries. The rule of thirds method involves breaking down the photo in thirds, vertically and horizontally to have nine parts. The focus object is usually not placed in the middle which results to it being interesting, moving and dynamic. Factors to consider are the point of interest and the frame. Mentally divide your viewfinder into three to frame the shot.

Golden hour

Also referred to as the magic hour, it is the first hour of sunrise and last time of the sunset. The light is of different quality thus add quality and interest to the photo. It requires one to be fast for the quality of light fades quickly

Fill flash

This technique involves filling the dark areas of an image using flash. The background of the picture is usually brighter than the subject. A photographer needs to adjust the shutter and aperture speed to expose the background. The circumstances when to use flash are:

• When foreground light is less than in the background

• When close to the focus subject

Long exposure

It is an effect that creates a dreamy landscape, it both captures still elements and moving. Objects in motion usually are blurred. The photographer narrows the aperture and sets the shutter to a long duration speed.